American Locations 12 – Cape Cod

This trip goes from Cincinnati, Ohio, to the Boston area, then up the New England coast all the way into Canada, then back through the Adirondacks to the Finger Lakes Region of upstate New York.

Like Plymouth, we’ve made several trips to Cape Cod. It is south of Plymouth. You drive onto it on Hwy. 3 across the Sagamore Bridge.

The bridge crosses the canal that separates the Cape from the mainland. On the Cape the road becomes Hwy. 6. Turning onto 6A, we kept close to the northern side of the Cape, where there are numerous beaches.

There are other scenic places besides sand. Such as flowers.

There are small communities all along the Cape.

I’m not sure what these people are doing.

But I think that’s their dog swimming around.

There are narrow channels cut into the Cape to give inland communities ocean access for small boats.

Hwy. 6A merges back into Hwy. 6 where the Cape narrows, then juts northward. Soon after this we drove onto the Cape Cod National Seashore, which the Internet describes as ‘over 40 miles & 40,000 acres of dune-filled beaches, salt marshes & hiking & cycling paths’.    

It was stormy one time we were there.

Beyond the national seashore is Provincetown, at the very end of the Cape.

We stopped to roam around the waterfront.

This storm-damaged pier had been taken over by gulls.

The Provincetown breakwater.

There are 2 lighthouses.

There is also a Pilgrim memorial.

This marks the spot the Pilgrims first landed. They stopped at the end of Cape Cod before deciding to go on to Plymouth. So their first actual landfall was here, not onto Plymouth Rock.

Cape Cod is a beautiful place to see. Be forewarned the roads can be congested, especially in the summer.

Next Location – Newport, Rhode Island

American Locations 11 – Plymouth, Massachusetts

This trip goes from Cincinnati, Ohio, to the Boston area, then up the New England coast all the way into Canada, then back through the Adirondacks to the Finger Lakes Region of upstate New York.

To the south of Boston is Plymouth. We’ve made 2 trips there, the first to see the town, the second to see Plymouth Plantation. On our first trip we parked at Plymouth Harbor.

From there we could walk around to see everything. We started by wandering around the harbor.

As you can see in the background, there is a narrow breakwater extending far out into the harbor, including a footbridge for small boats to pass under. Of course, we had to walk it

There are opportunities for boat rides, either for fishing or whale watching, but we did neither.

Before leaving the harbor, we found a good place for lunch.

After lunch, we walked along the waterfront to Pilgrim Memorial State Park. We walked around the Mayflower II, a to-scale replica of the original Mayflower, but didn’t board.

We then walked to see Plymouth Rock.

It is still there, supposedly the original rock, unmoved from its original location, the Pilgrims first set foot on disembarking from the Mayflower in 1620.

From there we walked to Brewster Gardens, the site of the first settlement at Plymouth. Along the way we passed some old houses.

And churches.

This creek was one of the reasons the Pilgrims built their first homes at this place. It provided easy access to fresh water.

The park at the site of the original settlement is small but nice.

There are statues and memorials.

After, we walked back to our car parked at the harbor and drove north a short ways along the ocean front. We stopped just beyond the breakwater.

And a little further north to get out and walk on the beach.

On or second trip we toured Plymouth Plantation, a recreation of the original settlement. We started with the museum.

There was an interesting garment.

Next was a recreation of the kind of Native American settlement of the era. The exterior of one building.

And the interior.

A smaller structure.

And some Native American artifacts.

There were a few historical interpreters.

Then it was on to the recreated Pilgrim settlement.

A good collection of buildings.

Some interiors.

Ovens.

Vegetable gardens.

What the open countryside would have looked like back then. Except for the buildings peeking through in the background.

Next Location – Cape Cod

American Locations 10 – Halibut Point State Park, Massachusetts

This trip goes from Cincinnati, Ohio, to the Boston area, then up the New England coast all the way into Canada, then back through the Adirondacks to the Finger Lakes Region of upstate New York.

We followed 127 from Rockport on to the tip of Cape Ann, where Halibut Point State Park is situated. Being on the point, there is of course a lighthouse.

There is an old stone quarry there you can hike around.

But the real treat is being able to walk down to the ocean’s edge.

Here you at the easternmost point of Cape Ann. You are not standing on the side of a calm harbor or a protected bay, but jutting out into the Atlantic Ocean. The surf is tremendous. At least it was on the day I was there.

Run for your lives!

There is a trail leading up to a great viewing point.

It is atop a pile of granite slabs that were cut but never shipped. Once these slabs were cut at the quarry they were drug to the water’s edge to be picked up and transported by ship.

It gave great view.

Away from the wild surf there were rock playgrounds. One for the kids.

And one for the grownups to scamper around on.

Once we’d had enough we hiked away from the ocean.

And back to the quarry.

Climbing back into our car, we continued on 127 along the north side of Cape Ann, then across it back to Gloucester, where we turned onto Yankee Division Hwy. We drove on that off the Cape back to Beverly.

Next Location – Plymouth, Massachusetts

American Locations 9 – Rockport, Massachusetts

This trip goes from Cincinnati, Ohio, to the Boston area, then up the New England coast all the way into Canada, then back through the Adirondacks to the Finger Lakes Region of upstate New York.

From Gloucester, drive east on 127A along the coast to Pebble Beach. Take time to listen to the singing beach for a while. The singing is the noise the waves make as they rush across the rocks back out to sea.

Continue on 127A into Rockport. There is a beach here, too, every bit as rocky as Pebble Beach.

Of course, neither that nor the chilly water keeps people from enjoying themselves

But the main attraction is the waterfront. This is an old fishing community that has turned picturesque tourist.

Now nearing the water. You can see it in the distance.

The second most famous building on the water is the Old Stone Fort. Actually, this is a more recent structure built on the site of the Old Stone Fort, as, obviously, this is neither a fort, nor stone, and probably not all that old.

This red barn is the most famous building. It has been the subject of innumerable paintings.

Somewhere on the waterfront is this statue of a boy riding a frog.

The waterfront, with another shot of the famous red barn.

Another shot with the barn in the background

My favorite photo I took at Rockport. All the little sailboats with tents people are camping out under, and the kayaks arrayed, and the old buildings in the background.

Another of the harbor with the red barn in the background.

The breakwater and the entrance to the harbor.

And, guess what, one last photo of the red barn.

We have a favorite restaurant here, too, although I don’t have any photos of it. The Pearl. It has a dining deck overlooking the harbor, and excellent clam chowder. Here is a photo I got from the Internet.

It is easy to spend an entire afternoon roaming about Rockport.

Next Location – Halibut Point State Park